Thursday, January 10, 2008

Where on (Google) Earth #87

Having found Tuff's anticline in the last place I looked, I figured I'd put an easy one for the climate people up, in order to broaden our appeal.


You may post the location if you wish, but what I really want to know is the name of this feature, and why it is famous.

The Schott rule applies.

7 comments:

BrianR said...

boo yah!

65.706071°S
60.267786°W

Larsen ice shelf, which is along the eastern coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. It got a bunch of attention in the mainstream press when a large chunk (Larsen B sector) broke off into the ocean a few years ago.

Chuck said...

I had no idea the image reference text would have the name of the continent on it- just in case anyone was expecting to find something like this in the Amazon...

I think this may be a picture of the B breakup, but I'm not 100% sure.

BrianR said...

Oh wow...I didn't even notice that (no, really)...yeah, sometimes those image citations help, sometimes they steer you off track.

Where-on(G)E #88 is up (here)

Chuck said...

You know, in hindsight, I wonder if this is just sea ice from a winter pic after the ice shelf disappeared. Any cryosphere people out there who can give us a clue? Bueller?

Kim said...

It's in the process of stretching NE-SW in this picture, though - look at the orientations of the en echelon fractures, and where they are widest.

Hey, ice is just another rock capable of brittle fracture...

Chuck said...

I was gonna as sinistral or dextral for extra credit, but I didn't want to be too demanding.

sagan said...

it is a beautiful example of a riedel shear array in a left handed strike slip fault.
the orientation of the dilation is ~ E-W and maximum compression is ~ N-S oriented with the shear trending NNE
If this was a little older - say Archaean I'd be looking for gold in that sort of riedel array

sagan