Sunday, July 22, 2007

Where on (Google) Earth? #37



This has to be the easiest woge since the LGM ice caps slid into the sea. While the Schott Rule still applies (one hour per previous win), people waiting for the clock are welcome to name as many glacial features as they can make out in the picture.

Kent got it last night, bit I'll put up Yami's clues anyway, since they are interesting.

Oblique Google Earth view, looking south from small western plateau:

Actual view from same location:

8 comments:

Chuck said...

Are you guys off reading Harry Potter or something? I will post a clue, but only if y'all can name 3 glacially produiced landforms shown here...

Kent said...

Not at all. I looked, and found nada.

Anne said...

Other than the northern hemisphere, I'm not sure where to start. But I will supply cirques, tarns, and deranged drainage as three glaciogenic landforms in the photo.

Chuck said...

A number of regular readers of this blog have been to the locality pictured.

24 hours and three more landforms will generate a second clue.

BTW, which features give the hemisphere away?

Yami McMoots said...

My initial thought was that glaciers + easy = Yosemite, but no.

There are some wee drumlins in the lower left. I see at least one nice arête, and a bunch of SW/NE-trending striations.

Kent said...

No idea why Cradle Mountain just popped into my head, but there you are!

41º56' S 146º05' E

Chuck said...

Cradle Mtn. is actualy 40 km north of this location, but your numbers are correct. In fact, Lake St. Clair is just visible at the very bottom of thte pic. Between Lake t. Clair and Cradle Mountain is of course the overland track, Australia's premiere long-distance bushwalking trail.

The rocks are all Jurassic basalt and dolerite (local name for diabase)- and there is a photo of the northern edge of this area elsewhere on this blog.

Nice job cracking it at 2 in the morning, mate.

Kent said...

Apologies, yes. Lake St Clair. I was naturally a little fuzzy on details at 2am.

WoGE 38 is posted.